You are currently browsing the archives for May, 2009.

New Musical Loop Guide Section Added!

May 29, 2009 // Posted in Audio Hardware, Audio Software, General, Software (Tags: , , , , , ) |  9 Comments

If you take a look at the Pages section of AdamSonic, you’ll see a new section entitled, “Guide to musical loops!.”  I created this for anyone interested in learning more about building a loop library.  Enjoy!

– Adam Smith-Kipnis

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What is a Sound Designer?: Revisiting A 2006 interview

May 29, 2009 // Posted in Culture, Gaming, General  |  No Comments

I recently rediscovered an interview that I gave to an aspiring audio engineer in 2006. Three years later I’ve found that some of my views and opinions have changed and others have stayed the same… Read the rest of this entry »

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Looptastic Producer posts three new sets!

May 28, 2009 // Posted in Audio Software, iPhone stuff, Software (Tags: , , , , ) |  3 Comments

Sound Trends recently launched a new application called Looptastic Producer.  Looptastic is a performance remix tool for both the iPhone and iPod Touch. Looptastic Producer is the first product enabling you import your own loops. Read the rest of this entry »

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Sound Visualization Using the Elements: Part 3 – Liquid

May 26, 2009 // Posted in Audio Hardware, Culture, Visualization (Tags: , , , , , ) |  11 Comments

Ferrofluid (Magnetic Fluid)

I find ferrofluid to be fascinating.  Ferrofluid is a fluid which polarizes in the presence of a magnetic field.  This means that if you send a magnetic burst through it, you can create a visible ripple.  With steady magnetic fields, you could sculpt the liquid into any form imaginable!  As soon as the magnetic field is gone, the liquid loseWeight Exercises it’s form.

I’d imagine that it was the inspiration for Terminator 2.
“LiquidAudio was a course project for ECE362 at Purdue University. It takes in an audio signal from a standard stereo jack and outputs the average amplitude of 5 frequency bands in a pool of ferrofluid.

This video demonstrates the project to the music of “Wildcat” by Ratatat. ”

More Ferrofluid

Water

This is an excellent demonstration of Faraday waves. Faraday waves are standing waves that appear on liquids encased in a vibrating container. As the frequency of vibration changes, so does the visible pattern on the surface of the water.

Non-Newtonian Fluid
Water and corn starch on a speaker. Non-Newtonian fluid behaves as a liquid until force is exerted on it, in which case it behaves like a solid. By placing non-newtonian fluid on a subwoofer, the rapidly oscillating pressure waves cause the fluid to splash very slowly.

If you filled a pool with non-newtonian fluid, you could run across it and swim in it!

Next element: Light projected Imagery

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